Tag Archives: taxes

Reprise and Revise

I thought it might be fun to revisit a few of my previous posts and see what’s been happening since. Take Email Efficiency, for instance. A few days after writing that entry I was going through my Trash folder and discovered some Doctor of Credit newsletters. My mailbox sorting rules say they should just stay unread and be placed in the Archive, not sent to the trash! It turns out the fifth or so rule in my list of 357 filters — a rule I’ve had for years! — was loosely matching on a common phrase and deleting any emails containing a match.

That rule has now been deleted.

i do occasionally review the email in my Trash folder and this is the first time I’ve spotted something that I intended to keep. Perhaps I really haven’t lost that much mail due to this errant rule as I’d first suspected.

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Thinking about Tax Year 2018

This year saw income from a handful of sources other than a regular paycheck. This year I received:

  1. bonuses for opening new bank accounts – $3,800
  2. payment for selling trade-lines – $2,975
  3. another couple of thousand in new credit card bonuses, travel credits, and discounted gift cards

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Flurries

Flurries of activity, things get done. Lately lucrative bank bonuses earned in exchange for opening new accounts has become very attractive. Giving away my personal information to big financial institutions. Running their respective gauntlets, adhering to the requirements and rules, and operating within the terms and conditions:  Quite an awesome angle on extracting big bucks for simply playing a little game.

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Tricking Tax Year 2015

That title just sounds a lot slicker than “Unusual Retirement Account Funding Techniques.

Last year in April I wrote Debt Free, my ode to faithfully filling up my Vanguard Traditional IRA to its $5,500 brim. At that time I was about $2,500 short of maxing out my IRA. My solution was to fund my Target REDcard (since discontinued by American Express) by charging the $2.5k to my Capital One VentureOne card, withdrawing the balance from REDcard to my checking account, and finally transferring the funds to my IRA account.

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